A Travellerspoint blog

Country Two - To Market, To Market

To Buy Whatever You Might Want

The first time I saw a town market was in The Netherlands in 2002.
I was amazed and thought it was a rarity. I watched a middle-aged vendor spread his fingers through rayon panties for his old lady customer to inspect the fine quality of the weave. I saw meat, clothing, and baked goods. Little did I know then that these markets exist all over towns and villages throughout most of Europe. Everyplace has a specific market day when all the vendors come to town, park on the plaza, and everyone comes to shop.
I know, I know. You are going to say, "We have Farmer's Markets throughout the USA."
Somehow they are not the same. Yes, those in California are true Farmers' Markets; the St Paul, Minnesota market is also and is under a historical permanent roof year round, But certainly, the ho-hum markets in Colorado don't even compare.
In European markets, you can buy everything from Melita coffee cones, to French wine, to cheap shoes, and every kind of cooked and raw food.
Grote Markt on a Typical Day

Grote Markt on a Typical Day


Market Day

Market Day


Everybody Shop

Everybody Shop


The area is jammed with vendors on market day.
A Software Aisle

A Software Aisle

Rotisserie Kip

Rotisserie Kip


Bakery

Bakery


A market with everything is called a Grote Markt in Dutch. That is in contrast to an artisinal market that sells only finer quality or select foods and handcrafts.
I love the chaos of the Grote Markt.

In the Leuven Grote Markt, I kept wandering looking for the fresh fruits and vegetables. I saw a woman carrying a basket of beautiful sweet cherries.
I told her I spoke only English and I was looking for the fruit and vegetable section.
She pointed straight and said "go right" and seemed to falter as she kept repeating fruits, vegetables. I knew they weren't where she was pointing as I had walked up and down those aisles several times.
Finally, I pointed to her basket of cherries and asked "Where did you get these?"
She burst into a great smile and finally remembered what the words fruit and vegetable were. Her English brain slipped into gear, "Oh, go up there and turn at the corner!"
Vegetable and Fruit Section

Vegetable and Fruit Section


Even as much as I love the European markets, I was even more mesmerized walking though the bazaars in Azerbaijan. If you didn't follow that trip, click here.
I wish I had pictures of the indoor daily market in Atyrau, Kazakhstan, but that was back in 2002 and it is probably all modernized now.

On this shopping trip today in BelgiumYour text to link here..., I needed some fresh meat.
I stopped at a meat counter where I saw a "hamburger" sign on stacks of beautiful red burgers. I have not cooked a hamburger in months because in the USA, you must buy an entire pound of meat.
I asked for one hamburger patty.
I noticed some lovely wurst next to the hamburger and asked, "What is this kind of wurst? Can you tell me about it?"
Both vendors looked at me and asked where I was from. Then she said, "This is horse."
Horsemeat Vendor

Horsemeat Vendor


Well, I had to try it and asked her to wrap up one sausage. Then she explained that all the meat was horse meat; my hamburger was not beef.
I said I could only buy one horse and asked her to put the "hamburger" back.
We all had a great discussion on how to cook the sausage, the amount of horse meat eaten in Belgium and France, and the suppliers of horse meat are from North America!
Horsemeat for Sale

Horsemeat for Sale


I hope I don't upset anyone, but it was tasty. It is 30% pork, however. It was quite mild - definitely much tastier than the fatty seal meat I ate on the Iles de Madeline in Canada and has more flavor than boiled dog I ate during a Sioux religious feast.
Sausage in the Pan

Sausage in the Pan

Paula Eat It Like a Man

Paula Eat It Like a Man


While lunching on my sausage, I looked up and say Zip, my feline charge, splayed out on the roof.
Cat on a Warm Glass Roof

Cat on a Warm Glass Roof


I panicked and thought he had had fallen and broke his back. I thought the spirit of beloved animals was paying me back for my appetite.
Eventually, I realized he likes to go up and there and bask before the sun has reached the garden.

Posted by pscotterly 10:29 Archived in Belgium Comments (0)

Country Two - Belgium

Living in Kessel-Lo

I am house and cat sitting in a 1930s-era home in the little town of Kessel-Lo.
Lovely Sweet-Smelling Roses

Lovely Sweet-Smelling Roses


Ten years ago, I visited in Brussels and Brugge. (By the way, if you have not watched In Bruges, find it on Netflix.) When I was contacted for this opportunity, I thought it would be a great location to "pretend I live here."

And it is.
The Garden Wall

The Garden Wall


At Supper with My Happy Family

At Supper with My Happy Family


Denise and Rudi, owners of the home have gone on a holiday to Germany and Austria. It took a bit of prep, but everything was finally loaded - at least enough to get 100 yards down the street to where they picked up Rudi's mother.
Trying to Get On The Road

Trying to Get On The Road


Finally 3 Generations Herded Together

Finally 3 Generations Herded Together


They're Going I'm Staying

They're Going I'm Staying


Their adult daughter Magli lives in town so I have an emergency contact if necessary.
My Friend Zip

My Friend Zip


Zip is an old soul with arthritis similar to mine - it merely slows him down a wee bit and makes him appear a little stiff legged. He only requires feeding twice a day and spends the rest of the time sleeping on the enclosed patio or roaming in the charming, wooly garden.
One Half of the Main Floor Hallway

One Half of the Main Floor Hallway


The house is very comfortable with a hallway interconnecting four rooms on the main floor.
Dining Sittingroom

Dining Sittingroom

Convenient Kitchen

Convenient Kitchen

There are eight doors on the main floor alone that I must remember to keep closed. If I leave the patio door open, Zip sneaks his way into the house looking for a soft place in which to curl up. This is not allowed! As I rarely shut or lock a door wherever I am, It has taken me two days of running from door to door and lock to lock to keep Zip out and ensure I am following the household rules.
It took 30 minutes to figure out how to turn on the shower and the washing machine, but I was given a demonstration on the bread slicer, the bicycle locks, and all the door locks before the owners left. I think I have everything under control now.
Zip Waiting for Dinner

Zip Waiting for Dinner


The Northern part of Belgium speaks Dutch. The lower half speaks French. All the signs are printed in Dutch, German, and French. Fortunately, most people also speak English. It is worth reading the brief history of Belgium in Wikipedia. It all makes our Civil War seem tame.
Here Comes the #2

Here Comes the #2


The city bus runs by my front door about every 7 minutes.
A Bike to Call My Own

A Bike to Call My Own


Denise loaned me her bike to use during my stay. Bicycle travel is the best way to get around Kessel-Ro and the "parent" city of Leuven. I love European-style bicycling. It is commuting in your business clothes instead of dressed in Spandex and pretending you are training for the Tour d' France.
In the Garden

In the Garden


The city center is only a 15 minute bike ride. There were several stylists. It took me only two tries to find one with an opening for a haircut.That's My Hair Stylists But That Is Not Me

That's My Hair Stylists But That Is Not Me


Willy Loomans (who is also 70) gave me a great cut and his wife sent me on my way with a good style. I forgot to take their pictures, so I returned. They chose to stand in this spot to get their picture taken. I thought it made such a great photo, I did't crop it.
My house is across the street from an elementary school. I enjoy hearing the children's voices and laughter during recess.
I also kept hearing loud thumps. After school I noticed a large stack of logs and sticks. I then watched the children using these as weapons, building material, and with pure imagination. There appears to be no adult supervision during these times.
Schoolchildren Playing with Logs

Schoolchildren Playing with Logs


I am delighted. After living in the Nanny Nation of the USA and traveling in England that seems even more intent on halting any possible accident that might happen, I am having a ball watching the children run, play, fight, and still not get harmed.
Come back tomorrow. I will be here for another week and will share my experiences around this little section of Belgium.

Posted by pscotterly 06:56 Archived in Belgium Tagged belgium Comments (0)

Country One Stops Five and Six

The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly

The canal trip, the skipper and crew, and I all took turns being "the good, the bad, and the ugly."
First Day Out

First Day Out


Actually, the canal tour itself could have only been good. You can't blame Mother Nature for bad weather, which actually could have made the tour a bit more exciting for me. But it did make it very bad and ugly for Skipper Dave and Dave II when it poured rain all day.
I told them they could stop and weather it out as it looked like we had plenty of time to cover the few miles we had to cover before 5 PM of Day Four of my paid excursion.
"No, No! We cannot stop. We have people to pick up two days after you."

We did not stop at any villages. I was not allowed to tour the old mills or any museums that were close to the canal. Whenever I tried to get involved in opening and closing the locks, I felt like I was going to be in the way. Although they said I could help and even steer the barge, whenever I tried to do something it was always "Darling, you watch out...it's slippery... it will tear your arm off..." or whatever warning seemed appropriate to the task at hand.

Consequently, I spent most of the time riding in the barge except for walking along the tow path a few miles a day. Even then, I could not dawdle and look at any village or chat too long. I had to be sure I arrived at the meeting point before the Katie.

We moored each night near a pub. After a nice dinner in the barge and a short nap for Dave II, we headed for the pub. I quickly learned that pubs get full of Brits drunk on beer at a rather early hour. Skipper Dave and Dave II were gently drunk every night. After one night in the pub, that was enough for me. I haven't been a good pub drunk for decades.
This would have been no problem, except we did not moor near any charming villages.
I might as well have flown 8 hours and spent $200 a day to visit Larwill, Indiana. (Nothing against Larwill all you Hoosiers; but few would travel the world to visit it.)
On the second day, I did find someone to talk to on the street and an old church cemetery to walk through.
Charlie of Birstall

Charlie of Birstall


Ancient Birstall Memorial

Ancient Birstall Memorial


On the third day, Skipper Dave told me we were mooring for the night at a village where I knew there was a local museum that would be open for two hours after we moored. When I checked our location and the map, it seemed to me we had passed the location.
Eventually, Skipper Dave pulled up to a mooring point. I looked around and discovered we were mooring at the base of a nuclear power plant and were surrounded by the huge cooling towers I had seen on the horizon for miles.
Somehow, Skipper Dave had barged on past the one quaint village. We were only two miles from where we were supposed to be 24 hours from now.
That is when I became very bad and very ugly.
This entire journey had been like some men in the USA who go on a road trip and will not stop for anything except gas. Reaching our destination is the purpose of the trip. And, by cracky, we reached our destination 24 hours ahead of schedule.
Had we been traveling on the barge back in 1850, we should have been commended.
As we were on a pleasure voyage at my request, I definitely did not commend Skipper and Crew. I won't bother to tell what I said.
Suffice it to say, neither had seen and heard such a chewing out since they had left the Royal Navy and the merchant marines.
At Least It Is on the Horizon

At Least It Is on the Horizon


We did continue on down the canal a bit so that the power plant was only on the horizon instead of peeking in my window.
We moored at a village with a Medieval church cemetery I could visit and a great pub where the men got really drunk.
They loved the pub they found because they met an "army lad" who when I asked his age was a "54-year-old bloke." They weren't pleased with the marina because of all the "plastic boats" and few barges.
Oh No, Plastic Boats

Oh No, Plastic Boats


The next AM, I told Skipper Dave and Dave II to take their time getting into Shardlow, which was our final destination. I walked.
Somehow, I did not cross the correct bridge and lost the towpath. Instead, I walked crosscountry through a private fishing and hunting club and then found one of those famous county-sponsored foot paths.
I Missed the Bridge

I Missed the Bridge


There's a Footpath in Here

There's a Footpath in Here


It Is the Correct Town

It Is the Correct Town


I did make it to Shardlow a good hour before the barge and 10 hours ahead of when the trip was supposed to end. I finally had some time to walk around another English village.
Historic Ferry Fares

Historic Ferry Fares

Retiree's Residence

Retiree's Residence

Yee-Ha! A Bit of Americana

Yee-Ha! A Bit of Americana

Shardlow Original Lock House and Terminal

Shardlow Original Lock House and Terminal

Everywhere Flowers and Green

Everywhere Flowers and Green


Katie Gets to Shardlow

Katie Gets to Shardlow


The local museum was closed, but I approached a volunteer sitting on a bench. As it turned out, today was the annual visit of the local 3rd grade classes.
Schoolchildren Sketch Katie

Schoolchildren Sketch Katie


The volunteer sneaked me in between groups to see the recreation of what the living arrangement looked like on the barge back when they were used for transport.
In order to keep the goods moving, the whole family lived, ate, and slept in an area that was about 7' X 10'. Skipper Dave knows a man around 90 years old who was born into a barge family of six members who all lived on the barge until the 1950s.
Volunteer and a Bronco Fan

Volunteer and a Bronco Fan


Much to my surprise, I have met several avid American football fans. They still think Elway is the best of them all! The wife of this couple was the raving fan - he could have cared less. She kept asking my opinion about players and teams. All I could do was let her rub my hand and promise I would rub the Denver Bronco in front of Mile High Stadium on my return.
Now Honored

Now Honored


Because I raised such a fuss about the lack of charming mooring sites and the early arrival, Away4Awhile, the barge company, hired a taxi to drive me from Shardlow to Leicester. There, I could tour around at my leisure.
Dave II remembered that in 2014 Leicester was where they found the original grave of Richard III.
The town has built a very interesting visitor center where you can learn the newly-researched history of Richard III and compare it to the Shakespeare and Tudor versions.
You can also view his original grave under the car park. I talked with some residents about my age who have always lived here, They remember playing in the then-schoolyard which would have meant they were hopscotching on a king's grave.
Previously a Car Park

Previously a Car Park

Site of Original Grave

Site of Original Grave

Richard's New Digs

Richard's New Digs


There are several museums in Leicester - including the Medieval Guild Hall.
Historic Leicester

Historic Leicester

Medeival Arches

Medeival Arches

600 Year Old House

600 Year Old House

18th Century Leicester

18th Century Leicester

Leicester Guild Hall

Leicester Guild Hall


You can also visit the churches of Mary de Castro and the cathedral where Richard III is now interred.
My trusty cabby Lesley picked me up again and took me to the Church Farm Lodge back in Harrington where they treated me like a regular.
Lesley at the Church Farm Lodge

Lesley at the Church Farm Lodge


400 YO Pub 24 YO Chef

400 YO Pub 24 YO Chef


I walked across the road again to the Tellemarche Arms. This time I sat in the cozy area and had a good chat with the owner (manager?).
She commented, "I bet you meet a lot of interesting people on your journeys."
"Yes," I replied, "except for when I was here last week"
She looked slightly chagrined and said they always assume when someone sits in the dining room they want a more formal dining experience and don't want to chat it up with the staff.

So, now you know the rules of enjoying the pub.
If you want to get drunk and noisy, stay in the bar part or stick around until after 10 PM.
If you want a formal time with only the people at your table, sit in the formal dining room.
Formal Dining Room

Formal Dining Room


If you want to chat it up with the staff or anyone who might be in the same room, find the room that looks like a cozy dining room. (I don't know what they call it in England.)
Some More of That Harrington Gin

Some More of That Harrington Gin


I don't know about any other pub in England, but here in the tiny village of Harrington you will get delicious food from a 24 year-old chef if you sit in the bar, the cozy dining room, or the formal dining room.
Now This Is a Chicken Potpie

Now This Is a Chicken Potpie

Best Lamb Burger Anywhere in the World

Best Lamb Burger Anywhere in the World

Posted by pscotterly 04:12 Archived in England Tagged england Comments (0)

Country One Stops Three and Four

What a Way to Travel

A Fairyland

A Fairyland


An alternative to walking through the English Countryside is to book a trip on a narrow boat hotel.You could even learn to navigate one yourself, rent the narrow boat and be your own skipper and crew.
For Hire

For Hire


Skipper for a Day

Skipper for a Day


I chose to hire the crew.
Dave II and Skipper Dave

Dave II and Skipper Dave


The boats are narrow - maximum seven feet wide to be able to get through all the canals!
Back Door

Back Door


7' X 7' Kitchen

7' X 7' Kitchen


Parlor and Diningroom

Parlor and Diningroom

Lunchtime

Lunchtime


In Case of Cold

In Case of Cold


I thought one or two other couples would be on the boat. I was glad it was just "me and the men." Although it would have been fun to have some other folks to chat up and share the experience, quarters would be quite cramped - especially if you didn't get along. My recommendation would be to either go with friends or alone. The Katie had only three cabins and two heads. To get from the front to back, you must walk through all three cabins.
My 7' X 7' Cabin

My 7' X 7' Cabin


One of the cabins is for the skipper and his mate.
Crew's Bunk

Crew's Bunk


Skipper's Storage

Skipper's Storage


England has a vast canal system; Birmingham has more canal miles than Venice, Italy!
In the 18th Century, these miles of canals were dug by hand to connect the existing rivers and towns and make the trips to transport goods and raw products much shorter.
The miles of canals fell into disrepair. They became an eyesore and a neglected disgrace.
But a few diligent folks were committed to saving the canals. Today, they are beautiful waterways that are a part of the Canal and River Trust of the United Kingdom. An entire industry of tourism and equipment has developed around the locks in the past 30 years.
Because the land is not level like a tabletop, locks are in place on most rivers and canals. On one day, we had to pass through almost 20 locks.
First of Dozens of Locks

First of Dozens of Locks


Almost all of the locks in the English canals are operated by hand. It is a laborious process; especially when it rains the entire day in a very heavy, steady, cold downpour.
Only Lockkeeper on the Grand Union Canal

Only Lockkeeper on the Grand Union Canal


City Slicker and Katie Share Locks

City Slicker and Katie Share Locks


Around 1900, some investors did a last ditch effort to make the canals wide enough to accommodate two barges or a double-wide. Unfortunately, they did not widen all the canals and the efforts proved to be futile. Railroads had become the main overland distribution system, and it was not long before lorries were common.
Here are some pictures to take you on a 2-4 mile an hour trip through central, rural England predominantly in Northhamptonshire county on the Union Grand Canal and the River Soar.
We're Not the Only Bargers

We're Not the Only Bargers

Waiting Our Turn at the Swing Bridge

Waiting Our Turn at the Swing Bridge

Swan and Prow

Swan and Prow

Somebody Lives Here

Somebody Lives Here

Pasture

Pasture

Room for Both

Room for Both

Kayaks and Boat Bikes

Kayaks and Boat Bikes

Frank the Plank Sundial

Frank the Plank Sundial


Papa Mama and Signets

Papa Mama and Signets

Adolescent Geese with Parents

Adolescent Geese with Parents

Acres of Sheep for Miles

Acres of Sheep for Miles


I walked for some of the time every day. Originally, the towpaths were for the horses to pull the barges. Now, they are wonderful footpaths.Follow the Towpath

Follow the Towpath

I Take to the Towpath

I Take to the Towpath

Scene off the Towpath

Scene off the Towpath


Most of the time, I walked faster than the barge could navigate. That provided time to talk with some folks I met along the way.
Fisherman on the Grand Union Canal

Fisherman on the Grand Union Canal

Maiden Voyage for Handmade Barge

Maiden Voyage for Handmade Barge

Barge Builder's Assistant

Barge Builder's Assistant


Waiting for Katie

Waiting for Katie

Here Comes Katie in the Rain

Here Comes Katie in the Rain


There are probably more pictures in the Photo Gallery accessible from any of the blog entries.

Posted by pscotterly 01:35 Archived in England Tagged england Comments (0)

Country One Stop Two

36 Hours around an English Village

I have always wanted to stay in a little English village.
This trip, I got my chance and I enjoyed every minute of it. I hope you will also.
More Picturesque than Used

More Picturesque than Used


The train does not stop in many villages, so you have to choose a nearby town. My train to Kettering took about 45 minutes from London and was filled with commuters.
Kerrington Central Square

Kerrington Central Square


DSC08448

DSC08448


Because I assumed there was no place to eat in my village, I stopped at a restaurant in Kettering. I was not expecting to find a place like this in an English town of this size. Don't know why; guess it shows what we don't know.
To get to my village, I had to call a cab. The driver was quite excited to have someone from the USA in his hackney. He was going to visit San Francisco next month and drive across the USA to New York with his relatives who have a trucking company.
Twenty pounds (don't have the symbol for British Pounds Sterling) later, he dropped me off at the Church Farm Lodge where I was spending the next two nights.
Once a Barn Now the Breakfast Room

Once a Barn Now the Breakfast Room

Once a Stble Now an Inn

Once a Stble Now an Inn

My Eoom in the Country Farm Lodge

My Eoom in the Country Farm Lodge


This is still a working farm. A few years ago, they stopped raising livestock and only have field crops. They converted all the old barns and stables into a lodge. It is quite pleasant. The descendants are still living here farming and running the lodge.
Reaper Weather Vane

Reaper Weather Vane


After breakfast, I took a walk to the local church.
Harrington Church

Harrington Church

Harrington Cemetery

Harrington Cemetery


Shaded

Shaded


The village of Harrington has about 50 houses and a handful of farms along a country road.
The photos will give you a nice tour.

Typical House and Garden

Typical House and Garden

Typical Garden Wall

Typical Garden Wall

Over the Stone Fence on High Street

Over the Stone Fence on High Street


Intersection at Herrington Village

Intersection at Herrington Village

Houses On High Street

Houses On High Street

High Street in Harrington

High Street in Harrington

Garden Gate

Garden Gate

Every inch a Garden

Every inch a Garden


1950s House

1950s House


All across the UK are foot paths for walkers. They are marked with signs indicating the owners have given permission for the public to walk through their property. Some are designated for pedestrians and some for equestrians. For a good description of the small town UK public transportation and footpath travel, read Bill Bryson's Notes from a Small Island.
Footpath

Footpath


Throughout the UK

Throughout the UK


Along the Footpath

Along the Footpath


None of these footpaths lead to where I wanted to go. I decided to take a walk down the country road to visit a manor house and gardens in the village of Kelmarsh. The manor house for Hattering no longer exists.
Leaving the Village

Leaving the Village


Look at the following pictures and to go on the walk with me.
Horses in the Pasture

Horses in the Pasture

Farm Gate

Farm Gate


Road Narrows

Road Narrows


Sheep in the Pasture

Sheep in the Pasture


Cattle in the Pasture

Cattle in the Pasture

Crows in the Pasture

Crows in the Pasture


Sharing the Road

Sharing the Road


You Can't Take a Wrong Road

You Can't Take a Wrong Road


Beaten Badger

Beaten Badger


The British are tidy. By the time I returned to Harrington, the dead badger had been removed.
Along the Way

Along the Way


Kelmarth or Lamport

Kelmarth or Lamport


I arrived at Kelmarsh just as the gardens opened. The manor house was closed, but I did not want to walk an additional two miles to get to Lamport Hall which is open for tours on Thursdays.
Entering the Village of Kellmarsh

Entering the Village of Kellmarsh


Manor School Now Homes

Manor School Now Homes


The gardens were quite pleasant. You can see for yourself.
Tree in Bloom

Tree in Bloom


Roses and Topiary

Roses and Topiary


Path Around the Property

Path Around the Property

My Favorite Spot

My Favorite Spot


Kelmarsh Parish Church

Kelmarsh Parish Church

Kitchen Garden and Greenhouse

Kitchen Garden and Greenhouse

Last of the Asparagus

Last of the Asparagus

Kelmarsh Garden Wall

Kelmarsh Garden Wall

Kelmarsh Church from the Garden Path

Kelmarsh Church from the Garden Path

Jacobean Style

Jacobean Style

It Takes Many Volunteers

It Takes Many Volunteers


Even More

Even More

Down Another Path

Down Another Path

Double Row

Double Row

Around Another Corner

Around Another Corner

And Yet Another

And Yet Another

I stopped in the tea room and asked what they recommended if I were only going to be here one day in my life. The owner suggested their garden salad with a chicken breast! "I eat that three days a week in the USA!" I cried. Fortunately, one of the staff suggested an English tea service for one.
English Tea for Lunch

English Tea for Lunch

Injured Jackdaw Joins Me for Tea

Injured Jackdaw Joins Me for Tea


After lunch, I started my walk back. It was getting hot and my knee was starting to throb. I stuck out my thumb and Sid stopped and gave me a ride the rest of the way. Unfortunately, Hattering appeared so quickly we didn't have time to get to know one another. Guess we should have walked.

Despite the huge tea service for lunch, I also wanted to go to the village pub for dinner. The Tollemarche Arms has a very impressive menu and is in a very historic building.
Tellemache Arms

Tellemache Arms


When I entered the pub, to the right there was a small bar area with about six locals having a lively discussion. To the left was a lovely little sitting room with dining tables and upholstered chairs. There was a dining room down the hall behind the bar. I was suddenly struck with what grandson Bazil would call Social Anxiety. I didn't know what to do or where to choose to sit.
When asked, I chose the dining room. There I sat by myself for a wonderful meal while locals had a merry time in the other rooms. I felt better sitting there by myself than I would have in one of the other rooms with the merry locals. I am not sure why I suddenly became hesitant about interacting.
But the food was delicious. I have had four meals in England and all were superb.

By the way, Harrington distills a gin with local spring water and whatever all the other ingredients are in gin. That was really delicious!

Posted by pscotterly 22:16 Archived in England Tagged england Comments (0)

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